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Help Your Child Adjust To A New Sibling
With These Top Tips

How to prepare your child for having a new sibbling

Bringing a new baby is an exciting experience that can bring your family a lot of joy and happiness. But it can also be a confusing time for your older child, who may not fully understand what is going on. Babies will require your full attention that can sometimes result in older children feeling left out and distressed by this sudden change in their life. It’s vital as a parent that you prepare your child for the transition from only child to older child. Follow these tips to help your child quickly adjust to having a new sibling in their life.

Make the introductions a positive experience

First introductions will be the initial step in your older child accepting their new sibling into their life. Have the baby in a basket and lower it down to their level. Sit on the floor if possible, as this will make them feel more at ease. If your child is nervous about touching the baby, show them how to gently stroke or hold the baby’s finger. Provide plenty of reassurance and encouragement to build up their confidence. This will ensure they will feel more comfortable around their new sibling. It might also be good to let your child hold the baby under your full supervision. This will make them feel mature and this contact will strengthen their bond. Always analyse the situation and consider your older child’s mood before doing this. They may not be ready to do it just yet so don’t pressure them into anything.

Help your sibblings be happy
With good tips, parents should be able to help older child easily adjust to his or
her newborn sibbling and learn to have fun together. (Image by: Flickr.com)

Let them choose a gift for the baby

Many parents choose this option to help get their older children involved in preparing for the baby’s arrival. Take them to a baby store and let them select a particular item by themselves. It could be a blanket or a cuddly toy. This responsibility will make them feel special and they will enjoy being more involved in the process. Also, buy a gift from the baby to their older sibling to introduce a positive bond between them. Make sure that they know it is from the baby and not from you with a balloon or brightly coloured gift tag. You could also purchase personalised t-shirts that say ‘older brother’ or ‘big sister’ on. They will be proud to wear this item when they meet the baby for the first time.

Remind your family and friends

New babies are exciting and your close friends and family will want to bring gifts for your little one and hold them. This is when your older child is most likely to feel excluded, so remind everybody to also make a fuss out of them too. Let your older child answer the door so your visitors can say hello and talk to them as soon as they arrive. It might also be beneficial to let your visiting family members to look after the baby while you spend some time with your older child. This will help you to share your attention between your children.

These tips will ensure that your older child feels included and excited about being a big brother or sister. Shower them with love and reassurance and they will take to their new role like a duck to water.

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