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Wood Rot Repairs
Your Home Desperately Needs

How to prevent and repair wood rot around your house

With so many homes being constructed of wood these days, it's hardly surprising that wood rot repairs are in high demand. Walls, ceilings, and floors are all made of the stuff, and unlike many “artificial” materials, like steel and brick, wood needs a lot of care to keep it in the best condition.

Most of the wood rot in your home doesn’t happen on the inside (as many people imagine), it happens on the exterior where wood is most vulnerable to the elements and pests. Wood rot is most likely to occur in locations where water accumulates but does not quickly evaporate. It slowly seeps into the wood and causes it to become water-logged, opening it up to freeze-thaw weathering as well as mold and fungi.

Elements exposure leads to wood rot
After prolonged exposure rain, sun and snow, wooden boards and wood
in general start to rot, unless protected by appropriate paint. (Pixabay.com)

Where Are You Most Likely To Find Wood Rot In Your Home?

Wood rot is most common in certain parts of your exterior. This is where you should focus your inspections. The first place to look, according to Home Tips For Women.com, is just below the roofline. Most homes have a wooden fascia which can quickly become engorged with water if not correctly treated by the appropriate type of paint. The next place to look is your corner boards - little boards that stick out from the corner of houses. Because they are very exposed, they tend to suffer worst from rot.

You might also want to check the wood trim around doors and windows. These are common points of entry for both fungi and termites. If you think you have termites, Termite Control Plans.com recommends hiring a pest control expert to deal with the problem before it threatens the structural integrity of your home. Keep an eye out for the telltale signs of termite infestation, including dead termite bodies around your window sills.

Wooden furniture in garden
If you have outdoor furniture in your garden made of wood, it's a good idea to protect it against the elements, making it last much longer. (Pixabay.com)

Finally, check any decking around your home. Garden decking is a prime target for both fungi and pests and is quickly destroyed by the elements if left untreated. Unfortunately, a lot of decking isn’t properly treated by the people who install it, leaving homeowners stressed out and with a large repair bill on their hands.

How To Repair Wood Rot Damage

When it comes to repairing wood rot, you’ve got two options: you can either repair it yourself, or you can hire somebody else to do it. Which you choose depends on a number of factors.

First, do you have the tools and the experience to deal with the problem? If you don’t, you could end up making things worse or not dealing with the issue.

Second, are you able to reach the affected areas of rot from the ground or will you need to use a ladder? If you need to use a ladder and aren’t used to it, you could be putting yourself at risk of injury.

Thirdly, is any of the affected wood essential for the structural integrity of your home? If it is, then you may be putting yourself and your family at risk by trying to carry out repairs yourself.

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